Why is it important to stop cutting down trees?

The felling of trees deprives the forest of parts of its canopy, which blocks the sun's rays during the day and retains heat during the night. This disturbance causes more extreme temperature changes that can be harmful to plants and animals. Trees can store carbon dioxide in their fibers, which can reduce the negative effects of carbon dioxide on the environment. The Arbor Day Foundation says that in just one year a single mature tree could absorb more than 48 pounds of carbon dioxide.

Since carbon dioxide is the main contributor to greenhouse gases, this is a critical role in the fight against global warming. And, of course, trees release oxygen in return. Cutting down trees can cause habitat loss for animal species, which can damage ecosystems. According to National Geographic, 70 percent of Earth's terrestrial animals and plants live in forests, and many cannot survive the deforestation that destroys their homes.

If you're worried that your tree isn't healthy or are considering felling it, check with a nearby tree care service first. In addition to that, the ability of forests to extract greenhouse gases from the atmosphere is lost as forests are cleared. However, cutting down trees and replanting them, taking care to never completely eliminate local animal habitats, offers a surprisingly renewable resource for all our manufacturing needs. Large-scale logging can cause deforestation, a transformation from an area of forest to land with little vegetation.

Whether it's a single sapling in your garden or acres of forest, cutting down trees has long been considered a harm to the local environment, but that's not always the case. Tree felling is necessary to produce wood for construction, paper and other applications, but logging and other activities that kill trees can have a negative impact on ecosystems and the environment in general. They act as key guardians against soil erosion, a fact that was tragically made clear by landslides such as the one that occurred in Washington State last March, which many have argued were at least accelerated by logging. We use and waste paper every day without realizing that we're helping to kill four billion trees cut down every year.

While removing a tree is sometimes necessary, such as when a dead tree is dangerous, there are many reasons not to cut it down.

Ellis Machak
Ellis Machak

Hipster-friendly web geek. Friendly web fanatic. Friendly social media enthusiast. Incurable web guru. Avid pop culture specialist. Evil food lover.

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